Sustainable Development
International Monetary Fund Committee

Committee Description:

The IMF, or International Monetary Fund Committee’s purpose is to discuss issues that are associated with IMF’s function, such as promoting financial stability, stimulating trade and cooperation, and reducing global poverty across the world. 

Topic A: Humanitarian Relief (access to vaccines, relief to common illnesses/diseases) 

Statement of Problem:

With the COVID-19 pandemic, the entire world was confined within their homes to avoid exposure to the dangerous disease. Vaccines were developed and were rolled out in developed states, but many LEDC’s lacked the financial and institutional power to roll out vaccines at such a rate as developed countries. Hence, humanitarian relief is needed.  

History/Past UN Action:

  • ECOSOC High-level on “A Vaccine for All” Presidential statement 

Latest Developments:

Within ECOSOC “A Vaccine for All” presidential statement, key announcements and proposals have been identified by the speakers, such as the EU providing 100 million euros in funding to support COVID-19 vaccine campaigns across the world and other developed  countries promising to provide  millions  of vaccines to LEDC’s.   

Problems a Resolution Should Suggest/Possible Actions:

Determine ways of howhumanitarian relief could be provided to developing countries, and how the vaccination rollout process can be effectively performed. 

Questions to Consider

  • How is humanitarian relief to LDC important to global financial stability and economy? 

  • What plan of action can be imposed to provide access of COVID-19 vaccines to reduce COVID-19 illness rates in LDCs? 

  • Whose responsibility is it to provide humanitarian medical relief to developing countries? 

  • Does the ECOSOC “A Vaccine for All” provide effective, manageable course of action to solve the problem of humanitarian relief? 

  • How did the COVID-19 pandemic slowed the 2030 agenda? 

Topic B: Providing Basic Infrastructure to LDECs

Statement of Problem:

Basic infrastructure, such as rail, canals, hospitals, communication, sewage, and energy, are crucial to all countries. The United Nations must ensure a well framed programme that will ensure the contraction of infrastructure in LEDC’s. 

History/Past UN Action:

  • Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011-2020 

  • Unted Nations Support to the Least Developed Countries Report (sections Infrastructure, Energy, Housing, Water and Sanitation) 

Latest Developments:

Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2021-2030. 

Problems a Resolution Should Suggest/Possible Actions:

Determine ways in which basic infrastructure to less developed countries can be provided in the short-term and the long-term and how the lack and presence of basic infrastructure can impact the global financial securit

Questions to Consider:

  • Who is responsible in providing and supporting basic infrastructure construction in the developing world? 

  • What can a possible 5-year action plan entail to stimulate construction of basic infrastructure? 

  • How would that plan be different were it to be targeted for the next 20 years? 

  • How effective are the current UN action plans? 

Topic C: Combating Climate Change

Statement of Problem:

Climate change has threatened the long-term growth and prosperity of the world. Its impact on the environment has a direct impact on the world’s economy through natural disasters, mass migration, and lack of resources. 

History/Past UN Action:

The Paris Agreement in 2015 (Agreement to limit global temperature rise to no more than 2 °C)

Latest Developments:

UN is actively enacting laws to combat climate change such as eliminating fossil fuel subsidies and putting a price on carbon emissions.

Problems a Resolution Should Suggest/Possible Actions:

Fiscal policies are required to combat climate change.   

IMF may intervene in a new climate policy to financially help developing countries to follow the new policy and follow a low-carbon economy trend.  

The possible solutions could be mitigation, reducing carbon emissions through policies, adaption, building institutional resilience to a new extreme climate change, and transition to a low-carbon economy. 

Questions to Consider:

  • How can the IMF help fight climate change?  

  • How to decrease emissions? And How to convince countries to enact new laws for decreasing emissions?  

  • How does the IMF accomplish the goal of sustainable development? 

Topic D: Lowering Unemployment and Poverty Rates

Statement of Problem:

Unemployment lies at the core of poverty. Unemployment leads to high poverty rates and removes a chance of improving people’s well-being. Hence the creation of productive employment opportunities is essential for achieving poverty reduction and sustainable economic and social development.  

Moreover, the IMF expects inflation that has not been seen since after the 2008 financial crisis.  

History/Past UN Action:

  • Before the pandemic, significant progress had been made in alleviating poverty in Eastern and Southeastern Asia countries. 

  • 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  

Latest Developments:

Due to the Covid situation, global poverty rates have increased. In April 2020, the UN issued a framework for the immediate socioeconomic response to COVID-19 and created the Secretary-General's UN COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund. 

Problems a Resolution Should Suggest/Possible Actions:

  • Developing through industrialization: it comes with several positive effects: the establishment of a middle class, a consistent demand, and enhanced innovation.   

  • Promoting education: Promoting and improving skills acquisition in developing countries will provide better career choices for unemployed people and decrease the unemployment rates. 

Questions to Consider:

  • Do funds help lower unemployment and poverty rates?  

  • What’s the effect of COVID-19 on the unemployment and poverty rates?  

  • Will the fourth industrial revolution worsen unemployment and poverty rates? 

Topic E: Education as A Tool to Increase Economic Growth

Statement of Problem:

Lack of financial support from the government results in a lack of interest in education. Lack of education blocks the chance of any country’s economic growth.  

History/Past UN Action:

“In 2005, UNESCO launched the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development which reaffirmed the key role of education in shaping values that are supportive of sustainable development, and in consolidating sustainable societies.” - UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs. 

Latest Developments:

Governments are also developing technology. This influences the learning methods and systems for schools which gives them more value and helps to bolster the education system. 

Problems a Resolution Should Suggest/Possible Actions:

Opening more schools would lead to an increase in education level and economic growth.   

There will be more skilled workers as more people are involved in education.  

More financial support from the government on education is required.   

Developed countries’ help to educate people is also important. (Scholarship for international students from developing countries.) 

Questions to Consider:

  • What could the government do to increase the interest in Education?  

  • What would be the role of the government to motivate students? And who would be responsible for it?  

Topic F: Access to Free Expression

Statement of Problem:

Freedom of expression is a fundamental human right. However, to this day, in both developing and developed states there are groups who struggle to gain full access to freedom of expression for a wide range of reasons such as poverty, discrimination, and cultural pressures. Such issues are usually given attention to what extent they damage peoples’ lives, however the impact of such problems on freedom of expression is rarely addressed. The lack of access to freedom of speech is a problem that particulary affects the already marginilized groups: minorities, LGBT, and disabled people. The scale of their struggles varies, but the principle is the same for all: they face greater barriers to freedom of speech than others. If they are unable to communicate thier ideas, this means they are often excluded from meaningful participation in society.  

Today: 

Governments worldwide have used the Covid-19 pandemic to justify violating the exercise of free speech. Authorities have attacked, detained, prosecuted, and in some cases killed critics, broken up peaceful protests, closed media outlets, and enacted vague laws criminalizing speech that they claim threatens public health. The victims include journalists, activists, healthcare workers, political opposition groups, and others who have criticized government responses to the coronavirus. 

History/Past UN Action:

Freedom of speech is already under protection by international law of the International Covenant, Civil and Political Rights. So far this law has been signed  by 150 states. 

Latest Developments:

  • The economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic has hit many media outlets hard, threatening their very survival. Due to budget tightening, so did reliable information. To fill the information gap, rumors and extreme opinions surged in to fill in gaps. Nevertheless, the United Secretary-General has urged governments to “do everything in their power to support a free, independent and diverse media”. In addition to this, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights has highlighted the importance of free speech, which is the “cornerstone of democratic societies”.  

  • It is reported by Human Rights Watch that at least 83 governments worldwide have used the Covid-19 pandemic to justify violating the exercise of free speech. The governments have used physical force such as detaining, attacking, and even killing critics or those of different opinion.  

Problems a Resolution Should Suggest/Possible Actions:

  • Governments and other state authorities should immediately end excessive restrictions on free speech in the name of preventing the spread of Covid-19 and hold to account those responsible for serious human rights violations and abuses. 

  • United Nations Human Rights Council in its session beginning February 22, 2021, should commission a new report from the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights focusing on states’ compliance with their human rights obligations in responding to Covid-19, including the impact of restrictions on free speech and peaceful assembly. 

Questions to Consider:

  • How could additional UN actions protect freedom of speech? 

  • How would freedom of speech affect people?